Billy Davis’ Bio

Billy Davis and his Mother (2018)

Billy Davis and his Mother (April 2018)

Billy with his friend, around age 15.

This bio for Billy Davis was written in collaboration with his mother (Janet Davis). you see, Billy is developmentally disabled and visually disabled because of pre-mature birth, with a cyst in his brain that was not identified until the age of ten. Nevertheless, as an adolescent/teen, Billy became as sociable as his condition would allow, including fulfilling a romantic interest with the love of his life.

Billy also made friends with ease, especially male figures in, or above, his age group, which, in his naïve heart and mind, was a marvelous thing, however, that innocent interacting with others would prove fatal because – due to his under-developed brain – he was subject to manipulation by those who held little or no regard for his safety or well-being. To  everyone’s dismay, at age 19, Billy was implemented in a crime, along with others, (found guilty) and sentenced (under the Felony Murder Rule) to Life Without the Possibility of Parole (LWOP).

Billy as a young man in prison.

Billy as a young man in prison.

In the year 2000, while housed at CSP-Calipatria, Billy was stabbed several times and also received massive blows to his head causing the Cyst to rupture, caused cerebral spinal fluid buildup in his brain
triggering displacement of the brain stem, spinal damage and an enlarged cyst. After several surgeries and time spent in Segregated Housing Unit(s), Billy is now housed at CHCF, where he receives the much-needed medical/mental healthcare.

From his hand, he shares these words:

“I have been in jail/prison longer than I haven’t! Because of my medical condition, from birth, I wasn’t able to put my own thoughts together. So, I just took comfort in doing what I was told. While I still need to be told what to do, more and more, I’ve been realizing that I can make thoughts myself. While I’ve been in prison a long time, the CCCMS, DDP, CHURCH and GROUPS have helped me, and when I get out, I’d like to keep being able to learn from them. I’m also wanting to help change the way people think about each other, they should want to do all they can for each other. As for me, though, in its own way, my medical condition had positive aspects too. Unfortunately, I just don’t/can’t think of what is going to happen next. What I do know, though, is that if I don’t help everybody else, how can I ask for forgiveness myself!”

Through Billy’s many medical battles and misfortunes with the justice system, his family, mother, grandfather and sister have been there every step of the way; hoping, praying for a humane resolution of Billy’s cause.

In 2017, his family petitioned the Governor’s Office for a compassionate release, however, the family still waits for a response. Long before the judicial and prison systems misfortunes, Billy was born six (6) weeks prematurely, triggering hospitalization, surgeries resulting his arrested development in all areas of growth; he did not walk, or talk, until age two (2). Sadly, Billy’s trial attorney failed to present any of his developmental / visual disabilities during the course of trial.

Regardless, sentencing anyone in Billy’s condition to LWOP, and forcing them to serve out such is most cruel and inhumane. And, I am hopeful that we (citizens of California) can work together, and through legislation, to amend existing laws, or, create new ones that take into consideration the under-developed mental status of those LWOP’s who were above age nineteen (19) at the time of the offense and reconsideration for those offenders who have since fallen mentally/physically ill, and would be better off at home or a non-prison setting. So, let us be brave and work in a united effort for all those (like Billy and the taxpayers who pay for their long-term incarceration) who deserve better.

Billy Davis and his mother (June, 2018)

Billy Davis and his mother (June, 2018)

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